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Our Guide to the Street Markets in Rome

December 22, 2016 10:00 am by

When in Rome, do as the Romans and wander through one of the city’s bustling Street Markets!

There are many wonderful markets in Rome, you’ll find one practically in every rioni (or district).  Some have been trading for more than 400 years – others are more recent pop-ups. But regardless of their longevity, we guarantee that visiting markets in Rome is an excellent way to soak up the city’s unique atmosphere. To help you make your selection, we’ve put together a short guide to a few of our favourites. Our top tips? Listen out for some gentle banter, and don’t be afraid to haggle!

Porta Portese Market

Rome’s largest and most famous market (ideal for souvenir-hunting) Porta Portese Market is about a mile long and spills over into neighbouring backstreets. Endless stalls and traders in carpets, fabric, antiques, clothes and even pets provide endless happy hours of bargain-hunting. If you’re not keen on shopping, just soak up the vibrant atmosphere, but watch out for pickpockets!

Open: Sun 5am-2pm

Borghetto Flaminio Market

This weekly market in Rome is a must-see for anyone in the area surrounding the Piazza del Popolo. It’s an ideal place to pick up rare antiques and designer clothing, and you’ll find some real bargains thanks to Rome’s glamorous and fashionable locals. Armani sunglasses, Gucci handbags and fur coats are just a few of the treats in store for you.

Open: Sun 10am-7pm

Campo de Fiori

Rome’s oldest market, the Campo de Fiori farmers’ market, has been around for over 400 years. Although the name means ‘field of flowers’, there is in fact a wide range of products to buy here, including beautiful flowers, fresh fruit and vegetables, Italian meats and cheese, and local delicacies such as truffles and homemade olive oils. Probably not for you if you’re on vacation, but you can also get hold of kitchen utensils and various bits and pieces for the home.

Open: daily

Street Markets in Rome

Fontanella Borghese Market

If you’re an art or literature lover, a trip to the Fontanella Borghese Market is a great opportunity to find ancient etchings and prints, as well as bargain books. This market is the perfect place to pick up antique maps, vintage posters, used cameras, old magazines and newspapers and exquisite art. A nice change from the regular tourist souvenirs on offer in Rome.

Open: Mon-Sat 9am-7pm

La Soffitta Sotto I Portici Market

This market is a favourite with Rome’s young and trendy, who come to browse bric-a-brac and vintage. You can rifle through second-hand jewelry or clothing, and grab a real bargain if you’re in the market for silk scarves, crystal beads or antique lace. Located between the Spanish Steps and Piazza del Popolo, this market is in one of the most beautiful and historic parts of Rome.

Open: 7am-7pm on the first and third Sundays of the month

Campagna Amica Market

This covered market is a good one for foodies. You’ll find the freshest fruit and vegetables in the city, locally sourced from Lazio farmers and the region surrounding Rome. Taste honey almost straight from the hive and olives practically just fallen off the trees! And support regional farmers and the local environment.

Open: Sat-Sun 10.30am-7pm

Piazza San Cosimato Market (in Trastevere)

Known as the ‘Jewish Ghetto’, Trastevere is one of Rome’s most fascinating areas, with cobbled streets and peaceful hideaways. The origins of the market date back to the early 20th century and many of the vendors are descendants of the market’s very first traders. Regulars include a fishmonger, several butchers and plenty of fresh fruit and vegetable stands.

Open: Mon-Sat 6am-1.30pm

No trip is complete without a visit to one of these markets in Rome. Whether you’re an avid bargain hunter, a fierce haggler or a relaxed browser, these markets will give you a taste of Rome past and present – a sensation not to be missed. Happy shopping!

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